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Author Guidelines

Preparing an article for submission to “Stan Rzeczy”

The submitted article should include the following information:

  • Names of all the authors, their ORCID numbers and affiliations (give the name of the university in the original language; if the name of the university does not indicate its location, add the name of the city after a comma, for instance: Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan).
  • Bibliography (see below for details).
  • Abstract (no more than 1,000 characters); the abstract should be a succinct summary of: the aims of the article, i.e. the research questions; the methodology used; the main conclusions of the conducted study/analysis. The abstract should be comprehensible by itself, i.e. it should not contain references to illustrations, tables or bibliographical positions found in the main text, since in many indexing databases the reader does not have access to the full text of the article.
  • List of max. 5 keywords (keywords should be arranged alphabetically and separated by commas; names should be arranged alphabetically by surnames and placed at the end of the list, for example: meta-theory, relational sociology, relationism, Dépelteau François, Fuhse Jan A.).
  • Biographical notes of the authors with email addresses (scholarly titles, such as professor, should not be capitalised; translated titles of works should be placed in square brackets; information about the author’s works should only include the title and the year of publication) for example:

 
/// Elżbieta Hałas – full professor of humanities and sociology at the Institute of Sociology, University of Warsaw, Poland. Her fields of interest are theory of culture and cultural sociology, social symbolism, symbolic politics and cultural memory, symbolic interactions, and social relations. Her research is focused on the problems of contemporary cultural transformations. She is the author of many publications in international journals, as well as multiple books, including: Przez pryzmat kultury. Dylematy badań nad współczesnością [Through the Prism of Culture: Dilemmas of Research on Contemporaneity] (2015), Towards the World Culture Society: Florian Znaniecki’s Culturalism (2010), Symbole i społeczeństwo [Symbols and Society] (2007). She is the founder and co-editor of the book series “Studies in Sociology: Symbols, Theory and Society.”
Email: ehalas@uw.edu.pl

General style isssues
Please use:

  • British English (centre, not center; analyse, not analyze; behaviour, not behavior, etc.;
  • –ise verb endings (not –ize; e.g., characterise, not characterize)
  • double quotation marks with punctuation set inside the quotation marks. For quotations within quotations use single quotation marks (e.g. The fictionalisation of the story determines its narrative potential, “turns ‘events’ into episodes.”).
  • cardinal numbers for dates, not ordinal numbers: 12 August 1960 (not 12th August 2018). For access dates in the bibliography use the abbreviated form 12.08.2018.

Citations and bibliography

Solution Example
Use the author-date style of in-text referencing.

Different authors in the same reference should be separated by semicolons, but dates of publications for the same author should be separated by commas. Authors should be arranged in alphabetical order.

(Mead 1934: 125)

(Collins 1998; Fararo 1989; Fuchs 1992, 2001)

In the bibliography if there is more than one work by an author in a single year they are distinguished by roman lower-case letters. Hałas E., ed. 2002a. Symbols, Power and Politics, Peter Lang.

Hałas E. 2002b. “Symbolism and Social Phenomena: Toward the Integration of Past and Current Theoretical Approaches, ”European Journal of Social Theory, vol. 5(3), pp. 351–366.

In the text: (Hałas 2002a: 52)

Use & to link dual authors.

Use et al. when there are three or more authors (but in the bibliography list all authors).

(Bourdieu & Wacquant 1992)

(Terenzi et al. 2016)

Other forms to be used in referencing: see, compare (not cf.), ff., ibid. (Archer 1996: 101ff.)

(ibid.) or (ibid.: 122) [when the work is the same, but not the page number]

For references that do not fit the normal pattern of author and title use the name of the body that produced the work. Otherwise use the title. Amnesty International. 1995. Prisoners Without a Voice: Asylum Seekers in the United Kingdom, Amnesty International.

In the text: (Amnesty International 1995)

Terms such as Ltd, & Co, can be omitted in the bibliography. Names of university presses should not be abbreviated. Cassell, not Cassell &

Co Oxford University Press, not OUP

How to style bibliography entries:

  • Printed book:
    Donati P., Archer M. 2015. The Relational Subject, Cambridge University Press.
  • Edited book (add the abbreviation ed. / plural: eds. after the name):
    Cropsey J., ed. 1964. Ancients and Moderns: Essays on the Tradition of Political Philosophy in Honor of Leo Strauss, Basic Books.
  • Translated book (use the abbreviation transl.):
    Lefort C. 1988. Democracy and Political Theory, transl. B. Macey, University of Minnesota Press.
  • Chapter or article in an edited book:
    Anastaplo G. 1999. “Leo Strauss at the University of Chicago,” [in:] Leo Strauss, the Straussians, and the American Regime, eds. K.L. Deutsch, J.A. Murley, Rowman & LittleField Publishers, pp. 3–31.
  • Article in another author’s book:
    Bourdieu P. 1967. “Postface,” [in:] E. Panofsky, Architecture gothique et pensée scolastique, Editions de Minuit, pp. 133–167.
  • Multi-volume works (when citing all volumes or just one):
    Jones D., ed. 1999. Definitions of Life. 6 vols, Pirate Publishers. Pfeiffer J.W., ed. 1991. Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, vol. 4: Organizational Models, Cambridge University Press.
  • Article in a journal:
    Ross N. 2015. “On Truth Content and False Consciousness in Adorno’s Aesthetic Theory,” Philosophy Today, vol. 59(2), pp. 269–290.
  • Online references:
    Butterworth Ch. 2010. Leo Strauss in His Own Write. A Scholar First and Foremost, http://www.bsos.umd.edu/gvpt/Theory/Transcript_Butterworth.pdf, accessed: dd.mm.yyyy.
    Donati P. 2011. “Modernization and Relational Reflexivity,” International Review of Sociology – Revue Internationale de Sociologie, vol. 21(1), pp. 21–39, doi: 10.1080/03906701.2011.544178.
  • Indicating an edition other than first/reprints:
    Denniston J.D. 1954. The Greek Particles, 2nd ed., Oxford University Press.
    Leff G. 1962 [1958]. Medieval Thought, rev. ed., Penguin. [when the author wishes to include information about the first edition, it should be inside square brackets]
  • Any other additional information about translations or other editions should be placed in square brackets:
    Schütz A., Luckmann T. 1975. Die Strukturen der Lebenswelt I, Luchterhand [Eng. transl.: The Structures of the Life-World I, transl. R.M. Zaner, H.T. Engelhardt Jr., Northwestern  University Press, 1973.]
  • Archival materials:
    List archival materials separately at the end of the bibliography. Include the information needed to identify the document, such as name of the archive, name of archival fonds or collection, a reference (section, volume, file number), page number, title of the document.
    For example:
    Houghton Library, Harvard University: Charles S. Peirce Papers, 1787– 1951 (MS Am 1632): MS 290, Peirce C.S. 1839–1914. Issues of Pragmaticism (CP).
    Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center, Steven and Clara Summers papers, box 1, folder 1, MSP 94: Letter to Steven Summers, 29 June 1942.

Every text should include an academic bio (about 100 words), an impersonal abstract in English (no longer than 1000 characters) and a list of 5 keywords (max.)

The abstract should be a succinct summary of:

  • the aims of the article, i.e. the research questions;
  • the methodology used;
  • the main conclusions of the conducted study/analysis.

The abstract should be comprehensible by itself, i.e. it should not contain references to illustrations, tables or bibliographical positions found in the main text, since in many indexing databases the reader does not have access to the full text of the article.

 

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